Caribbean Cruise – Antigua

The third stop on our Caribbean cruise was Antigua. We docked at the capital, St John’s, in the north-west of the island, which has a deep harbour suitable for large cruise ships. Antigua was named by Columbus when he first visited the island in 1493, and means ‘ancient’ in Spanish, but is also known locally as Wadadli, which has a meaning similar to ‘our own’, and gives a delicious meaning to the name of the local beer! By 1674 its main crop was sugar, and by the 1770’s it had a slave population of over 37,000, and a non-slave population of 3,000! The slaves lived terrible lives, malnourished, cruelly mistreated, and even killed by their owners. The slave trade was abolished in 1807, and slaves freed by 1834. In 1981 Antigua and its sister island Barbuda, became an independent state within the Commonwealth of Nations. Antigua’s economy now relies on tourism, with luxury hotels along the coastline, and throughout the summer months cruise ships visit almost daily.

Antigua is surrounded by coral reefs, with a coast-line of about 54 miles, and (we were told) 365 sandy beaches, enough for one a day for a year! We had decided it was time to spend a morning on the beach, so we took a taxi ride to Fort James, a quiet and pleasant bay not far from St John’s. After paying an ‘umbrella rent’ we strewed our belongings under our huge, hexagonal wooden umbrella, and went for a dip. I expected the aqua-blue water to be warm, or at least warmish – it wasn’t! Instead it was a refreshing cold, not the gasping cold, we’re used to in the UK. There were large, long roller waves that almost swept us off our feet, we were later told this was quite unusual. We dried off quickly in the sun, and did a bit of beach-combing across the hot sand, finding shells and pieces of coral that had washed up on the beach. It was hot but not overwhelmingly so, and a bottle of Wadadli from the beach bar, went down very well!

Palm trees grew along the beach, and there were scrubby trees with bright orange flowers, rather like azalea. A bird, with black plumage and bright yellow eyes hopped around in the sparse undergrowth at the edge of the beach, and then perched in the bushes; we later discovered it was a carib grackle. Fat pink doves cooed at us from the trees, and humming birds hovered around the flowers, iridescent blue and yellow, but they moved too fast to photograph. There were also huge, black frigate birds soaring high in the sky, and then swooping low over the sea.

The beach at Fort James, Antigua was completely what I expected from a Caribbean island beach – pale dazzling sand, clear blue sky, aquamarine sea, and wall to wall sunshine!

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Caribbean cruise – St Kitts – Brimstone Hill Fortress

After visiting Romney Manor, we travelled further up the western coast of St Kitts, to Brimstone Hill Fortress. The fort is situated about 800 feet above sea-level, on the top of a volcanic dome, and has amazing views across the Caribbean sea to the west, and steep hillsides with lush tropical vegetation to the east. The fort is surrounded by steep rocky slopes, that are almost vertical in places, and has a commanding position, overlooking the sea. Because of its strategic location, the British began fortifying the hill in 1690. The fortress was designed by British Army Engineers, and built by African slaves, using basalt blocks and local limestone. Much of the stone came from quarries lower down the hill. The fort was abandoned by the British in 1853, some buildings were demolished, and others just left to decay. Restoration began in the 1900’s and in 1985 Queen Elizabeth unveiled a plaque naming it as a National Park, and in 1999 it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

We zig-zagged up the steep, road and squeezed through the narrow gateway into the parking area. We got our bearings, and then made our way up the steep paved pathway. It’s quite a climb, but as you can see, the stunning panoramic views when you reach the top make it well worth the effort.

 

 

 

Caribbean Cruise – St Kitts – Romney Manor

The next stop on our Caribbean cruise was Basseterre, the capital city of the tiny island of St Kitts, where we were booked on a tour. The coach took us out of Basseterre, along the coast, and on the beach we spotted a pair of brown pelicans, the national bird of St Kitts, and later on saw energetic young egrets nesting in bushy, low-growing trees. We then turned inland, and before long arrived at Romney Manor, once the great house for a sugar plantation. St Kitts and Nevis are both volcanic in origin, with very rich fertile soil, ideal for the production of sugar. The islands were settled by the British in the 16oos, because of the huge financial gains to be had in the international sugar trade. Romney Manor was once owned by Sam Jefferson an ancestor of Thomas Jefferson 3rd president of USA, but was sold to the Earl of Romney in the 17th Century, and was then called Romney Manor. In 1834, the estate became the first plantation to free all of its slaves. Part of the estate has now been made into beautiful botanic gardens. Narrow paths twist through borders of bright, tropical plants and flowers, and a carefully kept lawn surrounds a 400 year old saman tree. The valley below is covered in thick green vegetation.

Within the gardens is a collection of buildings where Caribelle Batik create beautiful and unique fabric designs. They utilise traditional Indonesian methods using wax and brightly coloured dyes on high quality cotton fabric, that have unsurprisingly become the most sought after batik textiles in the Caribbean. We watched a fascinating demonstration, and saw swathes of newly finished batik designs drying in the warm air. Then we browsed around the extensive shop, where choosing what to buy was very difficult!

Does anyone know what the white flower is? It looks a bit like giant honeysuckle to me.

Caribbean Cruise – St Lucia

The first stop on our Caribbean cruise was Castries, the capital city of St Lucia, on the northern part of the island. Once off the ship, it was easy to get a minibus ride to see some of the sights. St Lucia is of volcanic origin, so is very mountainous. It is 27 miles long by 14 miles wide (for those familiar with England, it is a little larger than the Isle of Wight), and the highest point is Mount Gimie at about 3145 feetSt Lucia is thought to have been named after St Lucy of Syracuse, when French sailors  were ship-wrecked there on her feast day, so it is the only country in the world to be named after a woman! Historically it was fought over by the French and British, changing hands many times, until 1814 when it was finally taken by the British, and it remains a member of the Commonwealth. It is mainly an agricultural island, and although it used to produce sugar-cane, the plantations now mostly produce bananas. Tourism, especially visits by cruise ships, are now an important part of the economy of St Lucia.

We drove along narrow roads snaking upwards round hairpin bends. Dense undergrowth covered the mountainsides. Houses perched precariously on steep slopes, one side often propped up on stilts to form a level dwelling. We stopped at a banana plantation, and saw bananas in various stages of growth, from tiny newly forming bananas, to fully grown bananas swathed in blue covers for protection. Before returning to Castries, we stopped to look down on Marigot Bay, a sheltered bay on the western coast, where steep green forested slopes met golden sand and the blue waters of the Caribbean Sea.

 

 

 

I’m back!

I’m back! I have just spent a lovely fortnight, cruising around the Caribbean, before heading back across the Atlantic via The Azores, to Southampton. The nearer home we got, the cooler the weather, and now I’ve been back a few days, the cold, damp English spring is getting me down. The vegetation and flowers of St Lucia, St Kitts and Antigua were bright and beautiful, so here are a few flower pictures from St Kitts to brighten my day, and hopefully yours too. I’ve looked them up, but I’m not quite sure what some are, can anyone help me?

Moulton Windmill, Lincolnshire

I’m staying with my sister in Lincolnshire again, and as we had a free morning we decided to visit Moulton Windmill, somewhere I had not been before. We started off with a very nice coffee and walnut cake in the cafe, and then had a very interesting guided tour of the mill. Tony took us through the mill, clearly explaining the history of the mill, and the stages of its restoration. The tour took about an hour, and was fascinating, and most enjoyable.

Moulton Mill

Moulton Windmill is a brick-built tower mill, and at 100ft high is considered to be the tallest windmill in the United Kingdom, and one of the tallest in the world. It was built in 1822 by Robert King, and like many Lincolnshire windmills it has white-painted ogee cap – shaped like two shallow ‘s’ curves rather like an onion, and topped with a tall pointed finial. After being damaged by a severe gale in December 1894, the sails were removed and a steam engine was installed in the adjoining granary to power the mill, with a roller milling plant for processing animal feed. There are nine storeys, and on the elevated ground floor there is a separate miller’s office. The tower at the base is 28ft 9in, which narrows to 12ft at the curb, where the cap sits on a hexagonal wooden frame built into the brickwork, with an iron track to enable the cap and sails to turn into the wind.

A local restoration campaign was begun in about 1997, and in 2003 the mill was featured on BBC’s first series of ‘Restoration’. There were many fund-raising events, and a large Heritage Lottery Fund grant was won, so there was enough money to restore and refurbish the mill’s structure, build a shop and cafe, and fit a new ogee cap. The external reefing gallery 40ft above the ground was restored, and in November 2011 four new sails were finally added. In full working order again, in April 2013 the first bag of flour for more than 100 years was produced using the power of the wind.

Moulton Windmill, is situated between Spalding and Holbeach, about 4 miles from Springfield Shopping Outlet Centre, just off A151. It is open most days from 10am to 4pm, and some days there are grinding demonstrations – do check their website for details:  www.moultonwindmill.co.uk

Looking up

We usually see the world from our own eye level. Children see a swathe of knees and trousers – a limited view, their eye-line often blocked. As an adult I see from a slightly more elevated level, and see faces and expressions. Go higher and our view extends even further, but the higher we get the more we tend to look down. I remember a couple of years ago looking down from the top of Old Dungeness Lighthouse in Kent, and last summer staring out across the Lincolnshire countryside from Sibsey Trader Windmill. Even with our feet firmly on the ground, we are always looking down – avoiding muddy puddles, wary of the broken paving stone that might trip us up. Consequently, unless we’re star-gazing, we rarely notice what is actually straight above us. When we do look up, what a different world we then can see; from clouds to skyscrapers, from the natural to the constructed. New perspectives, fresh patterns, surprising shapes and shadows. A new view of the familiar, and an unexpected view of the ordinary that makes it extraordinary. So take a moment to look up, and be surprised!